Ashley Hammond

Ashley S. Hammond

Title:
Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Faculty: Full-Time
Address: SEH 6800
Email:
ashleyshammond@gwu.edu
Website:

Areas of Expertise

Evolution of apes and humans, especially the evolution of pelvic shape in both groups.

Ashley Hammond is a  functional morphologist interested in the evolution of locomotor behaviors in great apes and hominins. Most of her work focuses on the functional anatomy of the primate pelvis and femur, two anatomical regions that are extremely different between apes and hominins and reflect different locomotor specializations.

Current Research

Dr. Hammond isquantifying phenotypic variation in pelvis shape across anthropoid primates, including newly available fossil pelves, using a 3D geometric morphometric approach. As the study moves forward, the expected pelvic shapes for different last common ancestors (LCAs), and considering different phylogenetic and evolutionary scenarios, will then be quantitatively reconstructed at internal nodes in the hominid tree and rendered using novel visualization approaches.

Her long-term career objective is the discovery, description, and analysis of new fossil primates from East Africa. The Eastern African Rift System is the most important place in the world for understanding primate and human evolution. Her research in the region has focused on the Omo-Turkana Basin (southern Ethiopia-northern Kenya), which has primate-bearing deposits spanning the entire time period during which apes and hominins evolved (late Oligocene through late Pleistocene).

Education

Ph.D. 2013 (Pathology and Anatomical Sciences), University of Missouri
M.A. 2008 (Anthropology), Florida Atlantic University
B.A. 2006 (Anthropology and Social Sciences), Florida Atlantic University

Publications

Selected Journal Articles and Book Chapters

2017  Hammond, A.S., D. Royer, J.G. Fleagle. “The Omo-Kibish I pelvis,” Journal of Human Evolution 108:199-219. doi: 10.1016/j.jhevol.2017.04.004.

2017  Hammond, A.S., S. Almécija. “Lower ilium evolution in apes and humans,” Anatomical Record 300: 828-844. doi: 10.1002/ar.23545

2017  Middleton, E.R., Z.J. Winkler, A.S. Hammond, J.M. Plavcan, C.V. Ward. “Determinants of iliac blade orientation in anthropoid primates,” Anatomical Record 300: 810-827.

2016  Claxton, A.G., A.S. Hammond, J. Romano, E. Oleinik, M. DeSilva. “Virtual reconstruction of the Australopithecus africanus pelvis Sts 65 with implications for obstetrics and locomotion,” Journal of Human Evolution 99: 10-24.

2014  Hammond, A.S.  “In vivo baseline measurements of hip joint range of motion in suspensory and nonsuspensory anthropoids,”  American Journal of Physical Anthropology 153: 417-434.

2013  Hammond, A.S., D.M. Alba, S. Almécija, S. Moyá-Solá. “Middle Miocene Pierolapithecus provides a first glimpse into early hominid pelvic morphology,”  Journal of Human Evolution 64: 658-666.

Classes Taught

Research only.

 

Last updated June 22, 2017